Kips IT Class 9 Chapter 13 Solutions USING CELL REFERENCE Part-B

TextbookKips Information Technology Class 9
PartB
UnitUnit-4 Electronic Spreadsheet
Chapter13 Using Cell Reference
Other Chapters SolutionsKips IT Class 9 Solutions

Answer the Following Questions:

What do you understand by cell referencing?

A cell referencing refers to a cell or range of cells in a spreadsheet that can be used in a formula or function. With the help of cell reference, you can use the data within the the same worksheet or a different worksheet.

Define the following cell references with an example:
a. Absolute reference
b. Relative reference
c. Mixed reference

a. Absolute reference
Absolute Reference is used when you do not want to change the address of the cell while copying the formula to another cell. For this purpose, you need to add the dollar symbol ($) before the column and row number.
Example: =$A$1+$A$2
b. Relative reference
When you create a formula, references to a cell or range of cells are usually based on the position relative to the active cell. When you copy or move a formula to other cells, the cell reference changes automatically.
Example: The formula in A3 is =A1+A2. When you copy the formula from A3 to B3, MS Excel automatically changes the reference to match the location of cells, i.e., =B1+B2.
c. Mixed reference
It is a combination of Relative and Absolute references. In this type of reference, either row or column has to remain fixed.
Example: $A1+A$2

Differentiate between Absolute and Relative cell referencing.

Absolute referencing: Absolute referencing is used when you do not want to change the address of the cell while copying the formula to another cell. For this purpose, you need to add the dollar symbol ($) before the column and row number.
Relative referencing: In Relative referencing, references to a cell or range of cells are usually based on the position relative to the active cell. When you copy or move a formula to other cells, the cell reference changes automatically.

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